Best in Heritage: Social Participation; E-mail Saves Tree; Blogging Productivity

Welcome to a new feature here at Voices of the Past. We’re calling it “Best in Heritage” and it will showcase summaries of the outstanding current social media content in the heritage world. Okay, some of it’s just for fun.


A Revised Theory of Social Participation via Me-to-We Design
Nina Simon, Museum 2.0
In the first Voices of the Past podcast, Nina Simon talked about “Me-to-We” design and her Hierarchy of Social Participation. She recently tweaked those concepts (along with graphics) to demonstrate more clearly the stages of social participation and how visitors can become connected to heritage resources, and each other. According to Nina, this model “can help people feel welcome, confident, and eager to participate socially.” Though this model was originally targeted to museums, Nina’s concept is is a cornerstone of social media and has been featured in numerous blogs on a variety of topics.


Sweet … I didn’t know this was online
Dan Cull Weblog
Dan is elated about his discovery that the National Park Service has put its major publication journals online.

“I had no idea that the Parks Service had a bunch of their journals online,” Dan says. “It’s great to find online heritage resources I didn’t know about, especially those I should’ve known about.” The post outlines the purposes of three publications: Common Ground, CRM Journal and Heritage News.


Must-watch Video: Archaeology Finally Explained (BBC)

It’s suddenly all so clear.


Speedy E-mails Save Historic Tree
Debbie Smith, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

“I have some bad news. The city of Kewanee [Illinois] will take down the big hedge tree on Tuesday. Safety hazard they say.”

So began the e-mail that ultimately saved the lone survivor of an osage-orange hedge originally planted as an experiment to combat the 1930s dustbowl. It’s a story that demonstrates just how powerful the internet can be to rally people for the protection of heritage resources in a positive way.


Featured Podcast
Stone Pages Archaeo News Podcast Episode 158

Contents:

Narrator is our old friend David Connolly (BAJR)

Audio file mastering: Dave Horrocks (Infinite Wave)

Listen to the weekly Archaeo News [Total time 16:43]


Creative Destruction
Vince Michael, Time Tells

Heritage in context (i.e. looking at an object with respect to all the relevant heritage professions) is central to our mission here at Voices of the Past. It’s also a topic of Vince Michael post that explores the historical motives of interpretation in the preservation movement. Even today, heritage resources are won or lost based on the political influence of their supporters. Vince cites today’s open interpretive approach taken by some National Trust [and might we mention National Park Service properties] to conclude “… our current memory infrastructure requires an ever expanding field of relevance and revelation.”


Cool Flickr Pic
The Tetons – Snake River, by Ansel Adams. US National Archives

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Lots of wonderful content to use on the National Archives Flickr Stream.


Museum Media Blog

This is a new site that focuses on the use of new media concepts in the museum setting. It delves into the technology of … oh, let’s just let them say it:

“This website is an initiative of the award-winning Dutch company Infofilm. Infofilm is producer of digital media for museums: touch-screen apps, online collections, museum audio and video tours,  rfid-, wifi-, iphone-, ipod touch-applications, 2D and 3D animations, motion graphics, big screen presentations, cross media, etcetera.”

Looks promising.


And finally for a little lagniappe from the social media experts …

WordCast, a podcast on blogging, is currently featuring the topic of blogging productivity. A panel of expert bloggers participate in the panel conversation on everything from gathering content to balancing your online presence. If you’re looking to optimize your blogging life, this is an easy and informative listen.


If you don’t like our picks, disagree with our interpretation or have one of your own to add, feel free to tell us about it in the comments section!

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